Today's Reading

She ate lunch at the Thai spot that her driver had recommended, then indulged in a chocolate ice cream cone for dessert. Taking a seat on a park bench near the gondola station, she savored her treat and people-watched.

The town was bustling this August weekend with tourists and locals alike out enjoying the afternoon sunshine. She grinned as a pair of preteen boys whipped past her on mountain bikes, their mud-caked clothing providing as much evidence of a fun-filled, reckless ride down the mountain as did the joy in their smiles.

Too bad her weekend was packed with wedding activities. She wouldn't mind giving that a try herself. She was impressed by the way the ski resorts had found ways to attract vacationers, athletes, and daredevil fourteen-year-old boys during the off season. Such was the way little mountain towns became tourist destinations and supported thriving economies throughout the year.

She knew that such success didn't happen on its own. She'd had a front-row seat during the revitalization of Eternity Springs and saw how people had worked together to make it happen.

Eternity Springs. It's funny how the little town called to her. It wasn't even home. Not the home of her childhood, anyway. She'd never even visited Eternity Springs until her parents lost their minds and separated after she went off to college at Vanderbilt and her mother ran away from home.

The ringing of her cell phone interrupted her thoughts. She dug the phone from her backpack and checked the number and the time. Stephanie. They were due to meet up in Mountain Village in half an hour. "Hello, bride."

"Hey, Cait. You won't believe what happened. Our plane out of Logan was late and we missed our connection. We won't get to Telluride until late tonight."

"Oh no." Potential ramifications of such a delay flittered through Caitlin's mind. "What did you have scheduled for today? What can I do to help?"

"It's all covered. I built extra time into the schedule, thank goodness. I'm just really disappointed that you and I won't have our girl-time this afternoon to catch up, and of course, missing dinner with George and Nathan. Nathan was really looking forward to spending some time with you before we dive into wedding business. Tomorrow will be jam-packed."

Stephanie had been trying to set Caitlin up with her work friend ever since Doug dumped her. However, the guy's Instagram was a total turnoff and Caitlin simply wasn't interested. Unfortunately, Stephanie was a terrier when she set her mind to something, and she'd decided Caitlin and Nathan were made for each other—despite the little issue that she lived in NYC and he in Miami.

This plane delay might be a blessing, Caitlin decided. "Don't worry about it, Steph. You and I will both be at Marsha's wedding in October. We can have a nice long visit then."

"That's true. And maybe you and Nathan can find time to grab a drink together tomorrow. It might fit after our spa appointments and the guys' round of golf. I don't want you to miss the opportunity to meet him. Telluride is such a romantic place."

Caitlin closed her eyes and worked to keep the sigh out of her voice as she said, "Telluride is beautiful, Steph. It's a gorgeous place to have your wedding. And the weather for Saturday is supposed to be spectacular."

They discussed arrangements for meeting the following day. Before ending the call, Stephanie said, "If you happen to meet a tall, dark, and handsome stranger tonight, feel free to invite him to the wedding. I had six last-minute cancellations, and I've already paid for the meals."

"I thought you have your heart set on me and Nathan."

"I do, but it never hurts for a guy to have a little competition."

Thinking about her lack of a love life put a damper on Caitlin's day. Maybe she should have taken the shuttle driver up on his offer, after all. As luck would have it, as soon as she slipped her phone into her backpack, her gaze landed on a couple about her age, holding hands and stealing kisses as they walked along the sidewalk. This time, she couldn't hold back her sigh.

She was alone. Again. Still. How was it that she could live and work in a city of more than eight million people and always feel alone? Even when she was dating someone? But she did feel alone and she was tired of pretending otherwise. Tired of pretending, period. Hadn't she been partially relieved when after eight months of dating, Doug sat her down and gave her the "just friends" talk?
...

What our readers think...

Contact Us Anytime!

Facebook | Twitter